nature trail

Hoyt Arboretum Friends (HAF) is a membership-based, nonprofit organization working in partnership with Portland Parks and Recreation to support Hoyt Arboretum.

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Park Regulations

Alcohol Use

Redwood Deck Close Up.JPGIt is unlawful to possess or drink alcohol in Portland Parks without a permit.  Canned or bottled beer and wine are the only types of alcohol allowed even with a permit; no kegs or hard liquor. Sale or serving of alcoholic beverages requires a Special Use Permit, proof of liability insurance, and in some cases, approval by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission.

Music and Amplification Systems

Radios, tape and CD players must be kept at a sound level that does not go beyond the area reserved. Sound amplification of any kind requires self-monitoring by permit holders and excessive noise will result in a loss of security deposits. 

Collecting Plant Material

The collection of plant material or seeds in Hoyt Arboretum is not allowed without special permission and then for educational and research purposes only. Please contact Hoyt Arboretum curator Martin Nicholson at 503.823.4475 or martin.nicholson@portlandoregon.gov for additional information, or visit the Research with Hoyt Plant Materials page.

Barbeques

Self-contained barbecues on legs a minimum of 6” off the ground are allowed in the Picnic Shelter only.  Barbeques are not allowed in the Meadow or other natural areas. Permit holders are responsible for the safe removal and disposal of coals, grease and/or ash outside of the park. DO NOT dump coals or grease in the park.

Garbage

Renters and visitors are required to leave the rental areas, trails and picnic areas clean and free of trash and garbage. Use trash and recycling cans provided and/or bring plastic garbage bags and pack your garbage out.

Dogs

City law requires dog owners to keep their dog(s) on a leash at all times while in the park. There are no off-leash areas in Hoyt Arboretum. Dog owners are required to pick up and dispose of their dog’s waste each and every time. The purpose of the leash law is to ensure that dogs are kept under control for the safety and enjoyment of all park visitors and to protect the park’s environment, trails and wildlife.

If you are planning to bring your dog, please read our Dog Policy in the sidebar.

Bicycles

Bicycles, motorcycles and ATVs are strictly prohibited on the trails in Hoyt Arboretum. Bicycles are permitted on paved roads only in Washington Park and Hoyt Arboretum.

Dog Policy

Dogs-for-Environment-logo.jpgDogs are welcome in Hoyt Arboretum. However, city law requires dog owners to keep their dog(s) on a leash at all times while in the park. There are no off-leash areas in Hoyt Arboretum. Dog owners are required to pick up and dispose of their dog’s waste each and every time. The purpose of the leash law is to ensure that dogs are kept under control for the safety and enjoyment of all park visitors, and to protect the park’s environment, trails and wildlife.

If you care about the environment, here’s why you should …

Scoop the Poop

Doggie-doo isn’t just smelly and yucky to step in - it damages the land. Dog feces have a high nitrogen content, which fertilizes and spreads nitrogen-loving invasive weeds at the expense of native plants.  Poop fouls water sources with bacteria and harmful microbes and speeds the growth of algae in creeks and rivers. Parasites in the droppings can be a hazard to wildlife.

Keep Your Dog Leashed

All dogs are predators. No matter how harmless your dog seems to you, wild birds and animals are acutely aware of dogs on the loose and often take escape measures – running, burrowing, climbing, flying. These disturbances can have serious consequences for wild creatures, causing extra stress and the use of precious energy that may make the difference between life and death. Free-ranging dogs can also attack and kill wildlife. 

Stay on the Trail

When dogs run and play off the trail, they trample native plants and destroy habitat for ground-nesting birds. When they play in streams, they stir up sediments that can make it difficult for fish and other aquatic organisms to breathe.

When streamside shrubs and plants are destroyed, they can no longer provide shade for the stream or cover for wildlife. The lack of shade causes water temperatures to rise, which can be lethal for some species of fish. Also, streamside plants provide habitat for insects which are an important food source for fish.

Take the Pledge!

Support the Portland Parks & Recreation Department in their Dogs fo the Environment program. Take the pledge today.